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Vanavond kan je je kennis over de Cobrakunst bijspijkeren! Om 18:40, #npo2 bij #hetklokhuis. Doen!

Vrijdag a.s. 18:40 Klokhuis aflevering over de jubilerende Cobra kunstbeweging. Met Socha Duysker.… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…

Henny Riemens

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1928, Amsterdam – 1992

In Amsterdam Henny Riemens took pictures of Corneille and other members of the Dutch Experimental Group, which merged into Cobra at the end of 1948

Henny Riemens started her training as a photographer with Frits Lemaire in Amsterdam in the late 1940s. At the beginning of 1948, she met the later Cobra founder Corneille, with whom she travelled to Paris. She took photographs there that were partly based on the Dutch tradition of documentary photography. In Amsterdam she took pictures of Corneille and other members of the Dutch Experimental Group, which merged into Cobra at the end of 1948. Because she recorded numerous important moments of the Cobra movement, she is also called the ‘eyewitness of Cobra’. Her photographs contribute to the positioning of Cobra in art history. Partly because Cobra became so well known, the other work of Riemens received less attention.

After the disbandment of Cobra, artist Asger Jorn organised a follow-up in Albisola, Italy, in 1954. In exchange for a work by Jorn, Riemens was invited to record the experiments and the gathering of the participants in a series of photographs. She often used just one shot to do so. She had fond memories of this time: ‘Complicated photocodes played through my head in fractions of a second as I hung around in the sleepy afternoon atmosphere, which was hung up as a décor in the dark studios’.

In 1977, she made the playful travel guide Neem nou Parijs (Take Paris), with photos by her and text by Jacqueline Wesselius. The guide attained true cult status. With her two-eyed reflex camera, Riemens captured the Parisians and portrayed their daily lives. Both Riemens’ name and work did not become very well known to the general public, however, and this is still the case today. When her name does come up in publications, it is often because of her relationship with Corneille.

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