We are open! (3 hours untill closingtime)

Follow us on Facebook for daily updates

Ter gelegenheid van de tentoonstelling ‘Art Brut | Jean Dubuffets revolutie in de kunst’ organiseert het… twitter.com/i/web/status/1…

RT @FCLKorver: Wepublic is lid van #businessclub @cobramuseum, ik zit in bestuur. Meer weten over de business club? Let me know. Mooie even…

Expected 03 Mar 2019 - 30 Jun 2019

Expected: Kati Horna, Compassion and Engagement

Kati Horna recorded as a photographer, numerous major historic events in the twentieth century. For her, being a photographer was a way of contributing to her political ideals while at the same time being able to lead an independent life as a woman. After major retrospective exhibitions in Mexico City, Madrid and Paris, this will be the first retrospective with works from Horna’s entire oeuvre in the Netherlands.

As a photographer, Kati Horna (Hungary, 1912 – Mexico, 2000) recorded numerous major historic events in the twentieth century. She was witness to the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire; the outbreak of the First World War; the Second World War; and the Spanish Civil War. After major retrospective exhibitions in Mexico City, Madrid and Paris, this will be the first retrospective with works from Horna’s entire oeuvre in the Netherlands.

For her, being a photographer was a way of contributing to her political ideals while at the same time being able to lead an independent life as a woman. Horna chose involvement with her subjects over artistic stardom.

Kati Horna’s style is rooted in her childhood in the politically turbulent Budapest, and her later teens in Berlin in the run-up to Hitler’s regime. In 1933 she moved to Paris where she continued to develop herself as a photographer. This birthplace of surrealism intensified her preference for staged and poetic images. When the Second World War broke out in France she had to flee once again.

 

Kati Horna photographed by Robert Capa 1933

Horna gained great fame as a photographer with her photographs of the Spanish Civil War. At and behind the front she portrayed the Republican troops fighting against Franco. She was particularly fascinated by the consequences of the war on daily life, especially that of women and children. In 1939 Horna moved to Mexico City where she would stay for the rest of her life. Here, she became one of the most active photographers of the city with numerous publications in newspapers and magazines to her name.

Trained by the Hungarian photographer Jószef Pécsi, Horna belonged to a generation of photographers who were forced to flee Hungary because of the uprisings in the 1930s. The work of Eva Besnyö and Ata Kandó, part of that same generation, is also shown in this exhibition.

In collaboration with the Kati & José Horna archive, Mexico City, Dutch Photo Museum, Rotterdam and the Maria Austria Institute

Image above: Untitled, Guerra Civil, Bosque Carrasal Espana, 1937.

Kati Horna, Pedro Friedeberg disfrazado de Cebra, 1968

Activities within the context of the exhibition.

03.03.19 15:30

Interview between Stefan van Raay, director of the Cobra Museum and guest curator Marisol Arguelles and Norah Horna of the Colección Archivo Privado de Fotografía y Gráfica Kati y José Horna. This conversation will be in English

08.03.19 from 12:00 (more information on the time will follow)

International Women’s Day at the Cobra Museum

The Amstelveen Committee for the International Women’s Day (IWD) organizes a symposium with discussion and lectures in the cobra museum. Keynotespeaker is Peninah Musyimi of Safe Spaces Nairobi (Kenya). The exhibition UNSUNG of the photographer Anette Brolenius.can be seen in the museum.

07.04.19

The Female Perspective in Documentary Photography

Symposium organized in collaboration with FOTODOK. More information follows.

26.05.19

Program in the framework of the European elections. More information follows


            

Subscribe to the Cobra Museum newsletter