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Expected 11 Oct 2019 - 29 Mar 2020

Expected: Exhibition Intense Mexico: Politics, identity, sex and dead.

Famous Mexican art from the collection of the Museo de Arte Moderno (MAM), Mexico City

The exhibition Intense Mexico includes 46 paintings and photographs by famous artists such as Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros. This exhibition allows the public to become acquainted with the cultural involvement and aesthetic vision of artists in Mexico.

image: Olga Costa La vendedora de frutas 1951

The works on display cover the period from the Mexican Revolution in 1910 to the stormy rise of the globalization of the economy, knowledge, art and culture in the early 90s of the last century.

At the beginning of the last century, painters exposed the poverty and discontent among farmers. Later, as a result of the migration from the countryside to the big cities and the migration to the United States, other forms and archetypes of poverty and inequality emerged, including that of the street outcast.

 

Graciela Iturbide, Nuestras senora de las iguanas, Juchitan, Mexico 1979. Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura

The exhibition includes a diversity of portraits in which the theme of ‘national identity’ is set against the distinction in class, traditions or ethnic origin. The people portrayed are often idealized and are seducing the viewer. The sometimes almost erotic portraits are often a tribute to remote areas of the country, in particular to the southern state of Oaxaca, where ancestral traditions such as matriarchy, secret religious rituals and a historical tolerance of sexual diversity persist.

The exhibition also gives room to the imagination of the subconscious (in relation to ancient customs, but also to Surrealism). Five centuries later, the traditionally existing imagination full of dream worlds and ghost images is enriched with hybrid, zoomorphic and anthropomorphic motifs. In their idyllic landscapes, artists have wanted to portray both the spirituality and the primitive nature of Mexico: the promise of an existing or future Mexican paradise.

Guest curator: Sylvia Navarrete Bouzard, former director of the Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico City.

Rufino Tamayo, Desnudo en gris, 1931 Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura
Diego Rivera, Retrato de Cuca Bustamante 1946 Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura © 2019 Banco de México, Diego Rivera & Frida Kahlo Museums Trust. Av. 5 de Mayo No. 2, col Centro, alc. Cuauhtemoc, c.p. 06000, Ciudad de México".
Graciela Iturbide, Nuestras senora de las iguanas, Juchitan, Mexico 1979. Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura
Frida Kahlo. Los Cocos 1951. Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura © 2019 Banco de México, Diego Rivera & Frida Kahlo Museums Trust. Av. 5 de Mayo No. 2, col Centro, alc. Cuauhtemoc, c.p. 06000, Ciudad de México".
Graciela Iturbide, Autorretrato 1, de la serie Francolin, 2009. Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura
Rufino Tamayo, Desnudo en gris, 1931 Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura
Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Obrero en huelga asesinado, 1934. Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura
Olga Costa La vendedora de frutas 1951, Collection Museo de Arte Moderno/INBAL-Secretaría de Cultura

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